Lost     #FridayReflections #shortstory

Lost #FridayReflections #shortstory

Image courtesy : Pixabay.com

I felt the constriction in the chest.  It felt like dead weight on my throat. I couldn’t speak.  My  eyes widened but I couldn’t see.  It felt tight.  The tears still dry.

Not now.. not now.  Let me get home.

Thank God, today everyone is busy.  Even the receptionist who would otherwise have been just painting her nails.

I wish today was another day when I could have shut out everyone and cried?.

Roma had called frantically.  ‘Sumit is engaged,’ she said ‘and you did not tell me.  I thought you are still a couple.’ Continue reading

Book Blitz : Finding the Angel by Rubina Ramesh

Book Blitz : Finding the Angel by Rubina Ramesh

FINDING THE ANGEL
by
Rubina Ramesh
 
 
 
Blurb
 
All She wanted was love…
 
Shefali is a die-hard romantic. Having lost her parents at a very tender age, she is in search of a place which she can call home. Her passion for Art lands her a job as an art curator to the famous artifacts of the Ranaut Dynasty. When she meets the scion, Aryan Ranaut, she feels that her dream might come true until…
 
All He wanted was to trust…
 
Living the life of a modern day Prince is no easy task for the young and dashing Aryan Ranaut. Having lost his father to a rapacious woman, Aryan has severe trust issues. But upon meeting Shefali, he feels he could let down his guard. Until…
 
All They need is to find The Angel…
 
Just as Aryan realizes his love for Shefali, one of the most precious artifacts, The Angel, goes missing from the Ranaut collection. All fingers point towards Shefali—more so because she leaves the palace without telling anyone on the very night of the theft. 
 
Finding the Angel is a story where duty clashes with love and lack of trust overrides passion. Under these circumstances, can The Angel bring the star-crossed lovers together?
 
Grab your copy @
 
Amazon.com.au | Amazon.ca

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About the author
 

Rubina Ramesh is an avid reader, writer, blogger, book reviewer, and marketer. She is the founder of The Book Club, an online book publicity group. Her first literary work was published in her school magazine. It gave her immense pride to see her own name at the bottom of the article. She was about 8 years old at that time. She then went to complete her MBA and after her marriage to her childhood friend, her travel saga started. From The Netherlands to the British Isles she lived her life like an adventure. After a short stint in Malaysia, she finally settled down in the desert state of USA, Arizona. Living with her DH and two human kids and one doggie kid, Rubina has finally started living the life she had always dreamed about – that of a writer.

 
You can stalk her @

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Guess my Sun Sign   #FridayReflections

Guess my Sun Sign #FridayReflections

Winter is too cold,  summer is too hot.  I love the heavy rains,  but a hot summer ends up with the most beautiful rains.  Does that help you understand my sun sign?  Maybe not.  Let me try a bit more. I will speak up on what’s on my mind and tell you directly whether you like it or not.  But,  it will be with the sweetest smile on my face.  And,  I will not hate you.  As, life is too short to hate anybody but there is lots of time to love all.  Got it?

Hmph!  Let me give you another chance.  Or why don’t you tell me,  what can you not understand?  Let’s see if there is a way to arrive at a solution.  Now,  did you get it finally?   Continue reading

Teaser Tuesday 06-Mar #TeaserTuesday

Teaser Tuesday 06-Mar #TeaserTuesday

Women have always pulled down other women.  Personally,  never seen men do such things.  The world would have been a much different place if we were more united and supportive of each other.

The lines below are from the book ‘Pyre’ from one of my favourite authors, Perumal Murugan.  The hero, Kumaresan elopes with Saroja and has an inter-caste marriage. A newly married couple full of dreams and love go to live in Kumaresan’s village.  But Kumaresan’s old mother Marayi is not happy about it.  First, it is an inter-caste marriage,  second she is from a city and doesn’t understand village life of farming and third,  there was no dowry.  Marayi feels Saroja is as useless as a pretty picture hanging on a wall.  She is just good to look at.

 

One of the visiting women gossiped, ‘As soon as he got a wife, he made an enclosure for her to bathe in.  All these days, he had a mother.  She never got a private spot like this.’
‘Can a mother and wife ever be equal?’ retorted another woman.

 

The book is translated from Tamil (Tamizh) by Aniruddhan Vasudevan.  He had also translated Perumal’s award-winning book Madhurobaagaan into English.  Perumal’s writing is rich with regional accents and simple in its narration but complex in highlighting the nuances of mundane lives.  Have you read his books?

We should all be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

We should all be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

I have to travel to a different city this month for work.  And my first thought was what will I wear to the meeting?  I was more worried about what time I will reach there,  where will I stay,  will my clothes be in synch with the trend there.  I realised,  I did exactly what Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie said in her book ‘We should all be Feminists’.  If I was a male,  I would have prepared my notes,  set up my schedule for the meeting.  But,  as a female,  I thought about that last.  Isn’t that how we are all wired to think?  Isn’t it a bit unfair that we have to worry about our appearance,  an external, superfluous facade while the men can just go in crumpled suits and bad hair and get the work done?

We should all be Feminists is an essay prepared by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie,  a Nigerian author, for a TedX talk in 2012.  It was published as a 52 pages book in 2014.  You should all read it, atleast once.   Or listen to the talk which is available on the net.

Chimamanda talks about the differences we apply when treating women,  just because they are women.  She says in her own words, ‘by being born female,  she is guilty of something.’    We women are victims of our own society,  in the way we are raised.  It is in the way we are asked to dress, not to appear too smart in front of a prospective groom,  look down when we talk,  do not raise your voice against men.  Well, we can have whole chapters on honour killing, female foeticide,  child marriages, sati.  Many of our laws also do not grant equal freedom or financial security to women.   We even have some famous phrases in Malayalam like, “when men are talking,  there is no need of a woman to give her views or concern as it is insulting to the men.”.  In fact,  when searching for a bride in the family,  we are put off if we have to speak with a woman even over the phone.  Comments like,  “the woman seems to be the decision maker in the house”  is passed and looked down at.  We have to put on symbols to show that we are married like the mangal sutra,  sindoor.  What about the men?  They do not have to declare their marital status so blatantly.  One of my woman friends started earning more than her husband.  I remember her mother was so concerned that the poor husband will feel bad about it.   Bad for what?  For being successful? For having an intelligent, educated and well-earning wife?  If it was the man,  the woman would have been proud about it and may have flaunted it.

Chimamanda has pointed out that we are doing a great “disservice”  not only in the way girls are brought up but also boys.  She says, ““We do a great disservice to boys in how we raise them.  We stifle the humanity of boys. We define masculinity in a very narrow way. Masculinity is a hard, small cage, and we put boys inside this cage.”  As the mother of two boys,  I whole-heartedly agree with her.  Boys are automatically expected to study harder and earn better than their spouses.  It is mandatory that they should be a success financially.  It pressurizes the boys to get better jobs without giving a thought to what they want to be.  There is not much of creative freedom for them as well.  They have to be these aggressive,  strong and successful human beings who have to protect and support the females.  Why?  We do not want to be protected or supported.  Just let us be.   The recent suicide of a young man shook me.  He was successful in his studies and seemed a gentle soul.  But,  he was a failure in getting a job.  Ultimately he gave up.  If it was a female,  he would have worried about just getting married instead of feeling like a failure as she has the choice to remain unemployed.  But a man keeping house is somehow considered inferior or unsuccessful.  I wish we can stop gender stereo typing and let people be.  It is bad for the boys,  but worse for the girls.

When young, we give the girls wings to fly and tell them to reach for the stars.  As she grows older,  we tell her to fly slower than the boys and only take those stars left behind by the boys.  Further ahead,  we also tell her that she should not go for the stars. She should be glad that she has a place on earth.  Every day we kill her dreams one by one.

This book is full of similar thoughts,  things we take for granted never realising that we are contributing to the gender problems.  Read or hear this book.  Let it make you uncomfortable and change your ways in bringing up the next generation of boys and girls.  Highly recommended for all.

 

#MondayMusings